Is Church planting just a trend?

My friend, Matthew Wireman, has a post about the trendiness of church planting. He mentions his friend who had bought into the idea of church planting only to later retract his enthusiasm for it. Is it just a trend?

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Several reasons why church plants will supplant parachurch ministries

Here’s the rationale for my prediction that church planting will replace the parachurch as the primary evangelistic vehicle in America. Four reasons why church planting takes the best of parachurch strategies and reimplements them into the life of the local church: a. communities of faith: this is what the parachurch develops on campuses. People get involved in the parachurch community and then invite their friends to be a part. Church plants, who naturally attract younger people, can do this as well on a more permanent scale. This is the bedrock of evangelism. b. initiative evangelism: this doesn’t mean confrontational evangelism, but rather recognizes that the burden of initiative of spiritual conversations is on the believer. Parachurches teach this principle well, but church plants can be taught it also. c. outreach to emerging generations, generally attracting younger audiences. Since church plants do attract younger people on the whole, they will be…

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Church vs. Parachurch part II

Charlie wrote: Christ came to build his church and that is what he charged his apostles to do, but i argue that what is being described as “the church” is limited to to “the local church/es”. i can only comment on my experience at louisville, but this parachurch of ccc has fueled many local churches with students who know how to share their faith (something that many adults seldom if ever do), they know how to study the scriptures, they can disciple and be discipled, and they know what community and fellowship applied look like, and they know how to give. in parachurch ccc at uofl i have never sensed an us verses them, cru verses the church mentality. i have, on the other hand noticed an us verses them mentality of “local church” verses “local church.” CCC is targeting the young and so-called ’emerging’ generations. 50 years ago, CCC…

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Campus Crusade vs. the Local Church: my evaluation

Thanks for the comments guys. I think there are tremendous advantages to the parachurch, but on the whole, the campus ministry variety is a dying class. But first, the good news. Here’s are some advantages of parachurch ministry: 1. Scope: Singular commitment to a particular vision that has the muscle to reach a larger scope.The local church is at a disadvantage because its scope is going to be, by definition, limited to a particular community. 2. Ecumenism: Since CCC doesn’t focus on doctrines that can tend to divide, it can sweep up a large number of laborers into the umbrella for the purposes of evangelism, while leaving the doctrinal concerns under the purview of their specific churches. 3. Unhindered Focus: CCC can legitimately target those who would be ‘leaders’ while not giving  much attention to those who are less fortunate. That means CCC will generally focus on the educated, the…

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Discussion Topic: what do you think of the parachurch?

2 weeks ago i went to Colorado for Campus Crusade for Christ’s staff conference that happens every other year (does that make it biannual?). This is a big pep rally to get excited about CCC. While I was there, i found myself being more and more grateful that I am headed primarily into church ministry. Strange, though, at a place where i should feel most connected and excited about Crusade I found myself dreaming more and more about church. I will post more on this later, but I’d love some reactions from you.

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Why Cincinnati?

This is a question that I’ve been asked a lot lately. To be honest, I have no friggin’ clue. When I drive through the city on my way to Cleveland, I like it. It’s big. There’s lots of non-believers there. It’s a city. It’s close to grandparents. It’s close to Louisville. It has a river running through the middle of it. There’s roads and neighborhoods and people people people. There’s black people there. There’s white people there. There’s poor people there. There’s rich people there. There’s liberals there. There’s Nader worshipers there. There’s a road named after Ronald Reagen there. One of the most wicked places imaginable was ancient Ninevah, part of the Assyrian Empire. The Assyrians were exceedingly violent and wicked people, who tortured the people they captured in conquest and skinned them alive, stacking heads on pikes to parade through the cities and raping at will. God loved…

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Dreaming about Church Planting…

My dad asked me the other day, “why plant a new church when so many churches already exist?” Great question. Tim Keller, one of my heroes, answers the question here: But the less spiritual answer would be this: so many churches are entrenched in turf wars and tradition and protectionism (which is not the sole domain of the old fundamentalists), it would be extremely difficult to find the right kind of church, in the right location, with the right kind of people, who are teachable and eager to be led. Thus, plant a new church, with a fresh vision (not a reactionary vision), to: 1. reach people who are unchurched with a compelling vision of Christ and not gimmicks 2. build a community of people committed to Christ, each other, and the Great Commission 3. develop a network of other churches (and new plants!) who will strategically spread out throughout…

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